Undergraduate

Sociology examines the organization, structure, and change of societal groups. It combines rigorous methods of inquiry and analysis with a remarkable freedom of choice in research topics: mass media, the environment, racism, gender issues, class, war and peace, and deviance and social control, to name just a few possible topics. At Boston College, sociologists also take a transformative, activist approach toward issues of social injustice and inequality, making the sociological experience here not only rigorous and creative but socially relevant and engaged. Training in this field is useful in a broad range of occupations, and also prepares students for graduate study in a number of disciplines.

The diverse possibilities in sociology are reflected by our faculty, which includes scholars like Stephen Pfohl, who studies postmodernism and psychoanalysis, among other topics, and who creates art that experiments with new mediums of sociological exchange; Zine Magubane, an influential scholar and prolific writer (with article titles like "Globalization and Gangster Rap: Hip Hop in the post Apartheid City”); Juliet Schor, who's been interviewed on the Today show, NPR, and elsewhere for her research and books on the impact of consumerism on daily life; and many others.

We invite you to look over our website and see whether the study of sociology at Boston College seems right for you. If you have any questions about our program, feel free to email us at sociology@bc.edu, call 617-552-4130, or drop by our office at McGuinn 426.

Frequently Asked Sociology Questions

Listed below are the answers to some frequently asked questions about undergraduate study in Sociology at Boston College. In addition to the FAQs below, you are strongly encouraged to download your own copy of the Department's "Manual" for undergraduate students. This document will answer many of your questions.

The Student Services FAQ website answers more general questions such as:

  • How to register
  • How to use a degree audit and graduation requirements
  • How to overload (six courses in one semester)
  • How to take a class pass/fail
  • What to do if a class is closed or restricted
     

*Please note: These files are Adobe Acrobat® (PDF) formatted files. To view them you will need the free Adobe Acrobat file reader.